Pheasants Give Storm the Stamp of Approval

Long-time PF artist Scot Storm Honored with Hometown Day Celebration

St. Paul, MN - June 28 -

Scot Storm, the 2004-2005 federal duck stamp painter and long-time Pheasants Forever artist, will be honored by his hometown of Sartell, Minnesota on Friday, July 16, 2004. Storm's rendition of a male and female Redhead pair in flight was selected as the 2004-2005 federal duck stamp. To honor Storm's achievement, the Stearns County chapter of Pheasants Forever, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Minnesota Waterfowl Association, and the Minnesota Federation of Stamp Clubs will be hosting Scot Storm's Hometown Day Celebration.

Although Storm has won various state stamp honors, including Minnesota's 2004 duck stamp, this is his first federal stamp honor. The federal stamp goes on sale to the public on July 1, 2004. Storm is the 13th Minnesotan to be selected as the federal duck stamp winner in the contest's 70-year history. In fact, those 13 Minnesotans have won 19 of the stamp contests. Minnesota's James Hautman is the contest's only three-time winner.

"Minnesota can safely be said to be dominating this competition throughout history," added Chris Tollefson, chief of the federal duck stamp office. "It's a real testament to the commitment of Minnesotans to the future of wildlife conservation."

In fact, Minnesotan's have bought more federal duck stamps than any other state; 9.13 million since the program's creation in 1934. Overall, 119 million duck stamps have been sold. Those stamps have generated over $670 million. Those funds are used for wildlife habitat conservation across the country.

Storm has painted a variety of pheasant scenes for Pheasants Forever. However, his Legacy series is his most famous Pheasants Forever endeavor. Beginning in 2001, Storm began painting scenes from Pheasants Forever land acquisition projects around the country. Legacy depicts Minnesota's Kurilla Wildlife Management Area (WMA), Legacy II is of Iowa's Matsell Bridge Natural Area, Legacy III is of Nebraska's Wood Duck WMA, and this year's Legacy IV is of Illinois's Sibley property. All four land acquisitions are now open to the public for outdoor recreation; including hunting. In fact, Pheasants Forever has purchased over 90,000 acres of land across the country since inception in 1982. All Pheasants Forever land acquisitions are accomplished in partnership with state and/or federal natural resources agencies. Those land acquisitions are then turned over to the appropriate state, or federal, agency and then opened to the public for hunting and other compatible outdoor recreation activities.

The Scot Storm Hometown Day Celebration will feature an 11:30AM golf tournament at Blackberry Ridge and a 1PM sporting clay shoot at Wild Marsh Gun Club. A 6:30 dinner will follow both activities. All net proceeds of the day will go toward the prairie and wetland restorations on the 320-acre Prairie Storm Waterfowl Production Area in Minnesota's Stearns County. Please pre-register for the event by contacting Brad Cobb of Stearns County Pheasants Forever. Brad can be reached by phone at 320.255.9389.

Storm, 42, lives in Sartell with his wife Kristin and their 6-year old twins, Summer and Logan. Storm has an architecture degree from North Dakota State University, but left the field in 1999 to pursue a full-time art career. He began painting in 1988 and is a self-taught painter. To learn more about Scot, check out www.StormWildlifeArt.com.

Pheasants Forever is a non-profit conservation organization dedicated to the protection and enhancement of pheasant and other wildlife populations in North America through habitat improvement, land management, public awareness, and education. Such efforts benefit landowners and wildlife alike. Pheasants Forever has more than 108,000 members in over 600 local chapters across the continent.

Bob St.Pierre, (877)773-2070

Pheasants Forever is a non-profit conservation organization dedicated to the protection and enhancement of pheasants, quail and other wildlife populations in North America through habitat improvement, land management, public awareness and education. Such efforts benefit landowners and wildlife alike.